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Billions for sustainable investments – Germany’s plan for a green recovery

03 July 2020 | Mitigation

 

Germany wants to lead the green recovery – and it’s prepared to spend to get there.

As part of its $145 billion recovery budget, the country’s government has allocated some $46 billion to sustainable investments in areas like renewable power and electric vehicles, according to analysis.

Petrol- and diesel-powered cars – a lucrative industry for Germany – get nothing. Meanwhile, an industry of the future, green hydrogen, stands to benefit from a $9 billion boost.

 

What’s in Germany’s plan?

If approved by the German parliament, around a third of Germany’s $145 billion spending pledges could help bring emissions down.

The biggest single investment, at around $12 billion, is a commitment to help fund power costs, which have risen steeply in recent years. This is because German consumers have borne the cost of decarbonising the system through green levy surcharges. It’s hoped the investment will translate into more renewable energy.

Perhaps the most eye-catching announcement is a $10 billion bet on “green hydrogen”. Hydrogen stores well as an industrial and vehicle fuel but is energy-intensive to produce – unless sufficient amounts of renewable energy can be used to create it, hence green hydrogen.

Around $9 billion is earmarked for electric vehicle (EV) subsidies, which would – according to Bloomberg – make German EV buyers the most well-supported in Europe.

Other major commitments include public transport, and most notably the rail system which can create less carbon per passenger than other major forms of travel.

The sustainable direction of these measures is part of a longer-term plan for Germany, a country that has ambitions to be carbon neutral by 2050.

 

What about other countries?

While the EU has pledged to spend 25% of its budget on climate action, it is not yet clear exactly how much money this will mean in practice for green industries. South Korea has also made sizeable green commitments.

Many other nations are still working on their stimulus plans.

 

Source: The European sting