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Carbon capture needed in climate change fight, IEA says

20 June 2017 | Mitigation

Carbon capture and storage is gradually gaining government attention after being overtaken by investment in wind and solar energy, with the International Energy Agency (IEA) saying the technology will be crucial to limiting global warming.

The IEA estimates carbon capture and storage (CCS) will be needed to cut 14 percent of the emissions that have to be abated by 2060 to limit the global rise in temperature to less than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit).

"The size of the challenge really requires all technologies to be deployed," IEA energy analyst Samantha McCulloch said on the sidelines of a Global CCS Institute forum in Melbourne.

By one estimate, $80 billion has been invested in renewable energy compared with $20 billion in CCS, Australia's ambassador for the environment, Patrick Suckling, told the forum.

Efforts to expand carbon capture and storage include a Japanese project to bury carbon dioxide below the seabed off Hokkaido island and construction of China's first large-scale carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS) project at a coal-to-chemicals plant run in Xian.

In Australia, the government has proposed allowing its A$10 billion (5.9 billion pounds) Clean Energy Finance Corp to provide loans to carbon capture projects as part of a "technology-neutral" approach to cutting carbon emissions.

"We're seeing renewed interest from governments," McCulloch said.

 

 

Source: The New York Times